Pages tagged "Featured Blog"


The Fight for Open Elections - New Mexico

By John Opdycke, Open Primaries.

On November 13th, Open Primaries Education Fund (OPEF) filed a lawsuit against New Mexico Secretary of State Maggie Toulouse Oliver challenging the state’s expenditure of funds to supervise and administer its closed primary elections. New Mexico is one of only 9 states with completely closed primary elections, which disenfranchise the state’s 270,000 registered independent voters -- 22% of New Mexicans and the fastest growing segment of the electorate.

At issue is the unconstitutional use of taxpayer money to pay for primary elections that benefit private political party activities. Specifically, OPEF argues that the current system violates the anti-donation clause of the New Mexico Constitution, which reads:


Inspired Stories: Bridging The Divide

By Tammie Statler, Inspire U.S. Reposted from Inspire-USA.org

Inspire Leader, Claire Harmon, a senior at Marshall Co. High School in Kentucky, is a Fellow with the 22x20 which is a campaign to engage the youth to have a voice in the democratic process. 

Claire Harmon

This blog is an excerpt of Claire's recent interview with 22x20. 


5 Ways to Handle Political Conversations at Thanksgiving Dinner

By Julie Mastrine, AllSides.com. Reposted from AllSides.com.

We often think of Thanksgiving as a time when we relax with family and friends, stuff ourselves silly — and maybe apologize for burning the casserole. But aside from all the revelry, Thanksgiving can also bring uncomfortable political conversations.

Thanksgiving is truly a time when we’re forced out of our filter bubbles. Suddenly we find ourselves passing the mashed potatoes to Uncle Tom, a guy whose wacky Facebook posts we hid months ago — and hoo boy, he just brought up immigration.

While many of us have a tendency to surround ourselves with like-minded people and consume biased news the other 364 days of the year, suddenly, there’s no algorithm ensuring we confront only views we already agree with.


The Counterattack Against Rigged Elections Begins as Reform Succeeds in Several States

By James Kitfield, CSPC. Reposted from The Daily Beast

As the dust settles over one of the most bitterly fought mid-term elections in modern history, the tribal bases of both political parties continue to clash along the seams of a deeply divided nation. Democrats furious at President Trump flipped the House, but believe in some close races that they were the victims of voter-suppression efforts. Republicans expanded their majority in the Senate, but fear that a “deep state” in Washington is still out to get their president. The split decision on Tuesday did little to quell their partisan rancor.


Cynicism and Hope -- Our Work in the Revitalization Movement

Early this year, NBC News published a survey about Millennials and their thoughts on the future of our nation. The results of the survey were striking -- a clear majority (63%) of Millennials thought the country was on the wrong track, but the same number (63%) felt like they could make a difference by getting involved in politics. An even larger majority (75%) felt that community groups could make a real difference. In other words, Millennials were simultaneously pessimistic about the future of the country and optimistic about the potential for change.

As a Millennial myself, these borderline contradictory beliefs mirror mine quite well. I see a nation ruthlessly divided into overtly hostile political factions; two parties that seem content to weaken our democratic institutions in the name of partisan policy wins; and precious few (any?) national leaders who seem genuinely interested in bringing the country together. I also don’t think keeping Party X in power or voting in overwhelming numbers to take back power for Party Y will solve anything -- as I said in my post Country Before Party, I don’t think forcing one group’s vision for the nation onto the nation as a whole is a sustainable, or intelligent, strategy.


Building Momentum at the Midterms

Reposted from AmericanPromise.net

Projections show that more than $5 billion will be spent on the 2018 elections, a record amount that breaks down to $15 for every American or $60 for every voter in the 2014 midterm elections. All that money reflects the high stakes as Republicans and Democrats battle for control of Congress. While just more than a third of eligible voters showed up at the polls in 2014—the lowest in a midterm since World War II—election watchers expect voter turnout to be higher this time around.


My Inspiring First Week: Bridge Alliance Summit and NCoC Recap

October 16, 2018 kicked off the annual Bridge Alliance Members Summit followed by the NCoC’s Conference on Citizenship -- both in Washington, D.C. Hundreds of members and non-members from all over the country were invited to attend, which was reflected by the number and variety of people that filled the Marriott conference room. What was advertised as three days of convening and networking ended up being four days of genuine idea sharing and aggressive encouragement around the true power of civic engagement. As the newest intern for the Bridge Alliance and a first time attendee of a conference so large, I was stunned by the level of influence and sincerity that I witnessed throughout the week.


Proposal to Ban Classroom Political Discussions Will Only Hurt Students and Civil Discourse

By John Gable and Joan Blades (with a contribution from Julie Mastrine), AllSides.com. Reposted from AllSides for Schools

A Pennsylvania proposal to ban political discussion in the classroom aims to prevent political indoctrination — but it would only facilitate it.

Will Tallman’s (R) “Teacher Code of Ethics” bill would ban educators from endorsing or opposing political candidates or issues in the classroom and from discussing pending or enacted legislation, court cases or executive orders.


Then what, Bezos?

By Nick Penniman, Issue One. Reposted from IssueOne.org

The world’s richest man just made a significant foray into both political giving and philanthropy. In the span of a few weeks, Jeff Bezos has committed $10 million to a cross-partisan political action committee working to elect military veterans who have pledged to put “principles before politics,” and $2 billion to create his Day One Fund to combat homelessness and boost early-childhood education.  

These are noble moves. But there’s another piece of the puzzle I’d encourage him to consider: transforming the political system itself. Our political system is broken, and it is the source of much of the inequality and dysfunction he’s trying to cure.


When the City Comes for Your Home-Based Business: Overzealous regulators are targeting yoga teachers, accountants and even YouTube video creators

By C. Jarrett Dieterle & Shoshana Weissmann, R Street Institute. Reposted from the Wall Street Journal

Chandler, Ariz.—a city of some 250,000 southeast of Phoenix—describes itself as “built on entrepreneurial spirit.” You could forgive Kim O’Neil for not buying it.

Ms. O’Neil and her family are longtime residents of Chandler. Until recently she ran a medical-billing company in the town. For years she worked out of leased office space, but when Ms. O’Neil’s father became ill in 2013 she moved the business to her home. After her father died in 2015, she continued to run the business out of her house, because she could fulfill her work obligations while caring for her elderly mother.


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